Remember When

April 8, 2014

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              FENDER   SKIRTS AND SUPPER I   know some of you will not understand this, but I  bet  you know someone who might. I came across this phrase   yesterday.    ‘ FENDER   SKIRTS ‘A   term I haven’t heard in a long time, and thinking   about ‘fender skirts’ started me thinking about other   words that quietly disappear […]

Posted in: Senior Citizens

Beware of Liberals Touting Collectivism and Seeking Higher Taxes

January 24, 2013

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The following is an analysis by John Gray, professor emeritus at the London School of Economics: “One of the features that distinguished Bolshevism from Tsarism was the insistence of Lenin and his followers on the need for a complete overhaul of society. Old-fashioned despots may modernize in piecemeal fashion if doing so seems necessary to […]

An Economic Disaster Of Our Own Making

January 20, 2013

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“The quality of U.S. fiscal institutions has deteriorated. Recent actions by Congress and Presidents indicate no willingness to recognize limits to debt and to engage in fundamental fiscal reform. They have reacted to each deadline, such as the recent fiscal cliff, by taking minimal action and delaying fundamental reform that would stabilize the debt ratio. […]

An Example Of Reconciliation Of Plato With Christianity

January 19, 2013

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Boethius in the sixth century A.D. and Thomas Aquinas 500 years later, devoted their lives to the reconciliation of Platonic Philosophy with Christianity. One can see in this presentation reason why they both believed that Plato, at an earlier time, was teaching much of the same message that Christianity brought forth later.

PAX AMERICANA?

January 9, 2013

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Yale Professor Charles Hill writing Nov. 30 at The Caravan, a blog of the Hoover Institution: The mathematician and astronomer Johannes Kepler prophesied that “We shall not get through this time without difficulty, for all the factors are prepared.” Kepler was predicting the Thirty Years’ War of 1618-1648 that would launch the modern international state system […]

Ingratitude

September 1, 2012

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The Roman Statesman and Philosopher Lucius Anneaus Seneca believed that ingratitude should be a crime dealt with and punished by the State. Although most all today would disagree that the former should be the case, most today would agree that we live in a time where ingratitude is certainly rampant. Seneca in his book on […]

Philosophy As A Way Of Life And An Adjunct To Theology

July 14, 2012

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The following text is from a book review printed in today’s ” Wall Street Journal”.      By BRENDAN BOYLE ‘Vain is the word of that philosopher which does not heal any suffering of man.” By the lights of this maxim, taken from the fourth-century B.C. Greek philosopher Epicurus, contemporary philosophy looks awfully vain. Upon opening the […]

Posted in: Senior Citizens

SOMETHING TO CONSIDER

April 12, 2012

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Professor Andrew Stark of the University of Toronto quotes the Greek thinker Epicurius in stating that “The relationship between a person and his death, is a strange one.  Whenever one is present, the other is nowhere to be seen. As long as a person is alive, his death has not yet happened. And of course […]

“The Lord commands us t…

April 5, 2012

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"The Lord commands us to do 'good to all men,' universally, a great part of whom, estimated according to their own merits, are very undeserving; but here the Scripture assists us with an excellent rule, when it inculcates, that we must not regard the intrinsic merit of men, but must consider the image of God in them, to which we owe all possible honour and love."

John Calvin: from " The Institutes of Religion" published 1541.

Posted in: Senior Citizens

Those Oldies But Goodies

March 14, 2011

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As I was driving today my radio was tuned in to the XM music of the 50’s station. This is music that I listened to in High School. I liked it, but never gave it much thought beyond it being the background music of my adolescent years. It’s rather astounding that the simplistic three chord […]

The Roots Of Boredom

February 6, 2011

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“All men’s miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone”.  Thus said the French philosopher Blaise Pascal.  I used to think that boredom was an affliction that was peculiar to the young. Children and Youth are always rendering that complaint and view it as something very  difficult to endure.  I […]

A Tribute To My Bowling Team-Mate

January 28, 2011

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Today I lost a team-mate and a friend. She died unexpectedly, although when one is in their mid-eighties the possibility is certainly always there.   I bowl on a senior league bowling team. We bowl every Friday and have a great time.   Gayle was one of our most enthusiastic members and never missed a game […]

Are Things Today Really That Bad?

January 25, 2011

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The economy is depressed, people are out of work, real estate is in the tank and people are just generally fed up with a declining standard of living and the politicians that have caused most of the problems.   If this is your view of life in the twenty first century, let us consider what life […]

A Lesson From The Not So Distant Past

January 4, 2011

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This is Rudolf Havenstein. The name probably means nothing to most people. However, during the hyper-inflation in Germany that commenced after WWI.,  this man was the President of the German Central Banking System.  He held essentially the same position that Ben Bernanke holds in the U.S. today.   When Germany needed more money to fight WWI. […]

From Whence Cometh The Rage?

December 19, 2010

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The news this week, as every week,  is full of stories about people venting their rage against their fellow-man.  An individual walked into a school board meeting, drew graffiti  on the wall and then pulled a gun and shot at school board members from point-blank range. We hear of road rage with people taking shots […]

The Art Of Complaining

November 16, 2010

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“The meritoriousness of your complaint is directly proportional to the condition of those you are complaining to.  The illustration is from the  Steven Pastis  cartoon  “Pearls Before Swine ” He  has really hit the nail on the head with this entry from today’s newspaper. Very often great wisdom and heady observation emerge from the wonderful […]

Who said Calvinists don’t know how to have fun?

October 24, 2010

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The image of the non-fun loving Calvinist is in dire need of exposure to some light of truth.  John Calvin, though one of the intellectual giants of Theology, was not the judgmental curmudgeon that he is so often portrayed.  Brother Calvin, it seems was often seen, on days other than the Sabbath,  lawn bowling in […]

Aquinas, Kierkegaard and the demonstrability of the existence of God?

October 12, 2010

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Thomas Aquinas believed that the existence of God could be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.  He stated that there were five ways that this  proposition was demonstrable.  In his  “Summa Theologica”  Thomas  states his case beginning with the theory of motion and the necessity of a prime mover.  Aristotle had made this argument previously and […]

The Meaning of Faith in The Age of Scepticism

June 24, 2010

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While scanning the blogosphere and searching for something less depressing than the usual unenlightened nonsense I came across the  following: Atheist apologists seem always eager to assert that faith is belief without evidence, notwithstanding that no religion I’m aware of sees it that way (Christianity surely does not) and that dictionaries don’t define it that […]

National Policy Choices And An Uninformed Majority

June 9, 2010

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Recently Zogby International conducted a survey to measure which group of voters were more knowledgeable about the economic policy choices facing the United States.  Those questioned were asked if they considered themselves to be Liberal, Moderate or Conservative. They were also asked their political affiliation or party choice either Democrat, Republican or Independent. They were […]

Ford Announces It Will Discontinue Mercury

June 3, 2010

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One of the saddest days in American automobile manufacturing history occurred this week as Ford Motor Company has announced plans to drop its Mercury line.  Maybe its just nostalgia on my part that makes this news so sad. The Mercury line has not been profitable for many years, but back in the early and mid […]

Libertarians And The Temptation Of The Gold Standard

May 25, 2010

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The people who are part of the Tea Party come from many perspectives on the political spectrum and are not all lock step in their ideas of what needs to be done about our national economic dilemma,  however an inordinate number of individuals in the Tea Party seem to be of a Libertarian bent and […]

Economic Chaos, Three Possible Solutions

May 8, 2010

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It would seem that the recent economic crisis enveloping Greece is merely a preface to what is to come in many of our States and eventually to the U.S. as a whole. Our deficits are staggering and unsustainable. As I see it we have three choices, none of which are ideal.  Solution 1. We raise […]

Stops On The Way

March 5, 2010

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In 1961 I enlisted in the United States Army.  It seemed like the thing to do  because, at that time,  to say that my life was going nowhere would be a definite understatement.  I was 17 years old and  no one could tell me anything because I knew it all.  When I arrived at Fort […]

Justice Or Injustice?

February 13, 2010

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I recently finished reading “Justice” by Professor Michael J. Sandel. Professor Sandel teaches a class on the same subject at Harvard University. The content of this book is taken from the subject matter that he presents to his classes.  He basically wants the reader to examine questions of contemporary controversy and arrive at a way […]

The Trouble With Utopias

February 13, 2010

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“Boredom is the chancre of utopias” .       Schopenhauer

Reminiscing: My First Car

January 30, 2010

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In January 1960 I purchased my first car.  I was 16 at the time and working as an assistant shipping clerk in a large retail store. One of my fellow workers had a 1949 Plymouth that he was anxious to sell because he was buying a new car. I bought the car for $25,00 and […]

Looking Backward

January 27, 2010

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I just finished reading James Michener’s “The Drifters”. This is not one of his best works, but does engage one to think about the preponderance of the underclass in a society as wealthy and upscale as the United States. Michener follows six youth in the late 1960’s as they drift  from their comfortable homes to […]

Ode to Retirement

January 23, 2010

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How sweet it is to do nothing all day long and after having done so, to rest.

Rethinking Health Care

January 20, 2010

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In the 18th century the philosopher Voltaire commented on the Health Care of his day. ” It would seem that the Doctor’s function is to amuse the patient while Time and Nature cure the disease”.  Sounds like an HMO to me.